2012 North American IPv6 Summit Announced

The Rocky Mountain IPv6 Task Force has announced the dates for a joint event being called the 2012 North American IPv6 Summit. The dates of the event are April 9 – 11, 2012 and will be in Denver. Check out this link for more information.

IPv6 Fragmentation

Bill Cerveny of Arbor Networks has a great post on IPv6 Fragmentation. It works a bit differently in IPv6 from IPv4 and it’s a very important difference. This is especially true when considering how to implement a security policy. Fragmentation is one of the few uses of IPv6 extension headers seen regularly in the wild today and must use Path-MTU to work effectively.

The Impact of IPv6 on On-Line Marketing

A good paper to share with those in your company that handle on-line marketing has been released by Martin Longo, CTO of real-time identity firm Demandbase. The paper is called “Transition to IPv6: Why Online Marketers Should Care. If you think it’s just IT’s problem, think again” and makes the case for thinking about IPv6 now and not be caught unprepared during the transition.

TXv6TF Fall Summit Agenda Taking Shape

The mid-September Fall TXv6TF Summit agenda is starting to take shape. Today, TXv6TF announced that there will be a 3-hour hands on lab at the end of the 2nd day of the summit (September 15, 2011). This lab requires no prior experience with IPv6 and will be consist of the following agenda:

  • Short lecture – IPv6 addressing
  • Lab 1 – Configure network device with IPv6 SLAAC address
  • Lab 2 – Configure network device with IPv6 static address
  • Lab 3 – Configure network device for basic IPv6 routing between VLANs
  • Lab 4 – Configure network device for OSPFv3

The lab will be lead by Jeff Carrell and is free, but advanced registration is required and seats are limited. Each participant must bring a laptop with any operating system that has VPN (PPTP) and telnet capability in order to participate in these labs.

A Short Bit of Post World IPv6 Day Analysis

Both the European exchange points providing IPv6-specific traffic reports showed an increase in IPv6 traffic on World IPv6 Day. AMS-IX showed a a small increase (peaking at 2.9Gbs), but may not be statiscally significant. Based on looking at the year-to-date IPv6 traffic, it looks like the jump in IPv6 traffic started in February 2011 with an increase in peak usage from around 1.8Gbs to around 2.6Gbs. That roughly matches up with the time of the IANA IPv4 free pool exhaustion. DE-IX showed a marked increase in traffic appearing to at lease double its previous reports. It seems clear the community that used DE-IX was using the day to learn more about IPv6.

Ars Technical offers this summary.